Roof Structure

The design of a roof is expressed through two key elements: the supporting structure and its covering material (or cladding). Get these right and you could add enormously to the value of your home.

Let's start with the basics to get you on your way with structural considerations.

How your roof will look and perform warrants careful consideration. The number one priority is the right level of protection for your home, so think firstly about the climatic conditions of your home's location in WA, followed by its architectural style and any local council requirements.

One of the main determinants of overall roof design is its pitch, or slope. Measured in degrees as a ratio of roof height to span, this is expressed by its angle of inclination to the horizon.

In terms of weather performance, the steeper the roof pitch the faster the rainwater will run off it, thanks to the pull of gravity. This is an important consideration in wet and windy areas of WA so as to prevent a build up of water on the roof.

The weight of the roofing material itself also impacts performance in high wind areas. Terracotta and concrete tiles offer an advantage by offering more resistance to wind suction than lighter-weight materials such as steel sheeting.

Manufacturers of roof materials will specify the most suitable pitch for their products. As a general rule, the roof pitch will govern the length of the framework rafters, so decide on these two components at the design stage.

The minimum angle under Australian Standards for a tiled roof pitch is 15 degrees and Midland Brick has developed products to meet a demand for these more contemporary flatter roof styles.

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